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Know about these 4 Indian villages where SANSKRIT is still their first language

Dailybhaskar.com | Last Modified - Dec 22, 2014, 19:39 IST
  • Know about these 4 Indian villages where SANSKRIT is still their first language
  • Know about these 4 Indian villages where SANSKRIT is still their first language
  • Know about these 4 Indian villages where SANSKRIT is still their first language
  • Know about these 4 Indian villages where SANSKRIT is still their first language
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With the election of Narendra Modi as India’s Prime Minister, it was hoped that Sanskrit, country’s ancient language of Brahmin scholars, will be rigorously promoted. But, little has been done in this regard up untill now. It is believed that even in the language’s heyday, some 1500 years ago, Sanskrit was not used as a day-to-day language, but was used by Brahman intellectuals for scholarly purposes. 
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2.    Hoshalli, Karnataka

Hosahalli, along with Mattur, is known for its usage of Sanskrit as a primary language and for its efforts to support Gamaka art, which is a unique form of singing and storytelling in Karnataka along with Sangeetha (Carnatic music).

It’s located on the banks of Tunga River in Karnataka. These two hamlets are almost always referred together by virtue of the villagers’ penchant for using Sanskrit in daily communication.

Courtesy: Wikipedia

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3.    Jhiri, Madhya Pradesh

Jhiri is a remote hamlet in Madhya Pradesh, situated 150 km north of Indore. 1000-odd residents of this village hardly speak the local dialect Malwi, for it is the Indian ancient language Sanskrit that has replaced it in the last 16 years.
 
Banter, greetings, quarrels on the streets, teaching – it’s all in Sanskrit here. 

Courtesy: Wikipedia

Click next to know about other such Indian villages
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4.    Sasana, Orrisa

Sasana, a remote village in the coastal Gajapati district of Orissa, boasts of having a pundit of the ancient language in every home. Most of the dwellers in this hamlet are Brahmins and the village has around 50 households with 300-odd members.

A Sanskrit pundit employed in government-run Sanskrit-medium educational institutions can be found in every household here.

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